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Frequently Asked Questions

What is a learning disability?

Will my daughter outgrow or overcome her learning disabilities?

How do I know if my child has a learning disability?

Does Springer serve children with learning differences, including autism, Asperger's, below-average cognition and social pragmatic issues?

My son has been diagnosed with Executive Function disorder. Will Springer be a good match?

Does Springer admit students diagnosed with ADHD?

What does Springer's day school tuition include?

Is financial aid available?

What types of schools do students typically attend prior to enrolling at Springer?

Is support available when students transition back to mainstream school settings?

What kind of transportation is available to students at Springer?

Is a lunch program available for students at the day school?

Do students attending the day school wear a uniform?

Does Springer have extended day child care?

Are there after-school clubs or sports available for day school students?

What services are available for students not enrolled in the day school program?

Does Springer have programs to help me help my child?

I attended a class for teachers at Springer. Can Springer come to my school to do teacher programs?

GLOSSARY OF LEARNING DISABILITY TERMS

 

 

What is a learning disability?
A learning disability is a neurological condition which interferes with the ability to acquire, process, store, or produce information. It creates a significant discrepancy between an individual's intellectual potential and his/her success with any of the following: listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, and mathematics. Throughout the individual's life, the condition may also affect emotional well-being, interpersonal relationships, daily living activities, and vocational performance. Learning disabilities cannot be attributed to other difficulties such as physical disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional or behavioral disorders, or environmental factors.

Will my daughter outgrow or overcome her learning disabilities? 
Children can learn compensatory strategies to address their learning disabilities, but learning disabilities are a life-span issue. At different developmental stages, the impact learning disabilities have on school and vocational performance will vary depending on the nature and severity of the learning disabilities.

How do I know if my child has a learning disability?
You may suspect your child has a learning disability because he has difficulty recognizing letters, sounding out words, reading fluently, understanding mathematics, or completing written assignments. To determine if these difficulties are the result of a learning disability, an evaluation needs to be conducted. The evaluation should include as a starting point a cognitive assessment such as the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC V), and academic achievement assessments. Additional assessments in speech and language or motor development may be necessary.

Does Springer serve children with learning differences, including autism, Asperger's, below-average cognition and social pragmatic issues? The term learning differences is sometimes used in place of learning disabilities. However, it is also used to describe a broader range of issues that interfere with success in school, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder or lower cognitive functioning. Springer does not serve children who are on the Spectrum, have below-average cognition, or whose difficulties are primarily the result of social pragmatic issues.

My son has been diagnosed with Executive Function disorder. Will Springer be a good match? Executive Function disorder is a neurological impairment that impacts the ability to plan, organize and execute work. If EF disorder is the primary presenting issue, Springer will be able to address your son’s needs. EF skill development is woven throughout Springer’s curriculum and is a core focus especially for our older students.

Does Springer admit students diagnosed with ADHD?
Many students at Springer have diagnosed learning disabilities and ADHD. Studies reporting the coexistence of these conditions find that 15 to 35% of children with LD have ADHD. The additive effects can be significant, especially as academic demands increase. Some students are initially diagnosed with ADHD prior to their learning disabilities being identified. Careful review of evaluations and assessments during the admissions process will determine if Springer’s program is an appropriate fit.

What does Springer's day school tuition include?
Tuition includes daily instruction, books and materials, and on an "as needed" basis: occupational therapy, language therapy, and psychological services. Placement services are also provided for the first year after leaving Springer. 

Ninety-one percent of Springer's Ohio students receive the $10,000 Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship, which is applied toward tuition.  The Peterson Scholarship is non-need based meaning all Ohio children with an ETR and IEP can qualify for the scholarship.

Is financial aid available?
Need-based financial aid is available to assist with covering the cost of day school tuition. Springer currently provides assistance to one in every three children who attend. Springer is able to provide this assistance through our annual fundraising events, Annual Fund donations, and individual scholarship funds. Springer is also a provider for the Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship, available to Ohio families.

What types of schools do students typically attend prior to enrolling at Springer?
Students come to Springer from 56 zip codes in the Greater Cincinnati area. Springer serves Greater Cincinnati and the 13 surrounding counties that comprise the tri-state area of Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. Prior to enrollment at Springer, students attend a variety of public, private, and parochial schools.

Is support available when students transition back to mainstream school settings?
Transitioning students and their families are offered support through Springer's Placement Director. The services provided by the Placement Director include: meeting with parents and students to help plan the transition and identify appropriate school placements; working with the receiving school to qualify a student for needed services; meeting with the school to present a profile of the student's strengths and challenges; articulating to the receiving teachers the accommodations and modifications found to be beneficial to the student. Placement services are provided for the first year after leaving Springer.  More information on placement >>

What kind of transportation is available to students at Springer?
Some local school districts provide bus transportation for students coming to Springer. Parents should call their particular district to inquire about what is available and how to obtain the service. In addition, many families form carpools to get their child to and from school. A family roster with addresses and phone numbers is available through the school's main office for help in making carpool arrangements.   

Is a lunch program available for students at the day school?
Springer students are responsible for bringing their lunches to school except on Thursday which is  Order Out Day.  On Order Out Day, students can purchase their lunches from selected local vendors.

Do students attending the day school wear a uniform?
While Springer does not have a required uniform, we expect that students will dress in an appropriate, non-distracting manner for school. We define appropriate dress to include: slacks, jeans or sweatpants, shorts, skirts or dresses (mid-thigh or longer), and shirts with or without sleeves (no crop or tank tops). Clothing and shoes should fit in a way that is modest and provides appropriate coverage for the range of activities typical for a school day.

Does Springer have extended day child care?
Before or after-school child care is not available.

Are there after-school clubs or sports available for day school students?
Springer offers a variety of after-school activities and a number of intramural sports based on student ages and interest. Activities include Pottery, Primary and Intermediate Taekwondo, Intramural Basketball, Chorus, and many more. In the spring, students may elect to participate on Springer's competitive track and field team.

Does Springer have art, music, physical education, and library classes for students?
Springer's Unified Arts program integrates art, music, and physical education classes into each student's weekly schedule. In addition, each classroom is scheduled for a weekly library visit, where students participate in a library lesson and have time to select books.

What services are available for students not enrolled in the day school program?
Educational consultations/observations; parent consultations; a tutor referral list; and summer school programs.

Does Springer have programs to help me help my child?
Parents can attend popular center classes such as "Demystifying Dyslexia: Resources and Strategies for Success" or "ADHD and Executive Function" to increase knowledge of learning disabilities and to develop strategies for helping their child. Springer can also provide free evening programs at area schools.

I attended a class for teachers at Springer. Can Springer come to my school to do teacher programs?
Yes, Springer staff can work with school districts or individual schools to create customized training to meet the needs of their teachers.

 

GLOSSARY OF LEARNING DISABILITY TERMS

ADHD:  A disorder of brain function that can result in difficulty paying attention to details, sustaining attention, listening to instructions, organizing, and inhibiting responses or motor actions.

Auditory Processing Disorder:  Difficulty interpreting information that is presented orally.

Dyslexia:  Difficulty in reading, spelling, and writing that results from an impairment in the way the brain processes information.

Dysgraphia:  Difficulty with handwriting that results from an impairment in the way the brain processes information.

Dyscalculia: Difficulty with mathematical calculations that results from an impairment in the way the brain processes information.

Evaluation Team Report (ETR):  Used to determine special education eligibility. The ETR includes a summary of current performance, strengths and challenges and establishes eligibility under one of the special education categories. 

Executive Function:  Describes a set of mental processes that help us connect past experience with present action to perform activities such as planning, organizing, and managing time.

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA):  A federal law ensuring services to children with disabilities. IDEA governs how states provide special education services.

Individual Education Plan (IEP):  Every public school child who receives special education must have an IEP that details specific yearly goals and outcomes.

Meta-cognition:  Understanding one’s own thought processes.

Phonemic Awareness:  The awareness that spoken words are made of sounds, and the ability to identity individual sounds in words.

Phonics:  The understanding of the relationship between letters and the different sounds they make.

Visual Processing Disorder:  Difficulty interpreting information that is presented in print (i.e., confusing letters like ‘b’ and ‘d’).